Fighting Genetic Cancer           One Family At A Time

The New Standard in Cancer Prevention & Detection Earlier Than Ever Before Possible!​

We Want To Help You​​
.
By understanding your genetic risk for hereditary cancer, you and your doctor can make more informed decisions about your healthcare, manage your risks, and implement preventative care which can ward off cancer or detect cancer earlier than ever before, should it occur. 

How DNA Works
.
The majority of our DNA is the same from one person to the next, after all, we are all human. But, it's the remaining unique combination of variants that distinguishes us from one another.

Some of these differences are what increase or decrease our risk for certain diseases and how different medicines can affect us. These variants in our DNA are the basis of our unique genetic makeup.

Our Genes are not the only cause of cancer, other contributing factors are lifestyle, environment, diet, age, and exposure to toxic substances.

Now, with healthy lifestyle choices and the availability of Genetic Health Testing you can take the offensive against cancer with a simple Genetic Cancer Test.

Which Cancers Are Hereditary?
.
Some people are born with a gene mutation that they inherited from their mother or father. This damaged gene puts them at higher risk for cancer than most people. When cancer occurs because of an inherited gene mutation, it is referred to as hereditary cancer.

In recent years, scientists have discovered a number of mutations that can contribute to a person's risk of developing certain cancers, including breast, ovarian, endometrial, uterine, prostate, renal, colorectal (colon), stomach (gastric), liver, pancreatic, bladder, as well as some other, less common cancer types. 


If Your Parent Had Cancer Will You Get Cancer?

If a parent tests positive for a mutatable gene then their children have a 1 in 2 chance (50%) of inheriting it.  So some children will have the mutatable gene and an increased risk of developing cancer and some children won't.

Will Taking A Genetic Cancer Test Raise My Insurance Rates?


Some patients are concerned about their genetic tests being included in their medical history files.  Insurance companies use these files to assess pre-existing issues. NO GENETIC TEST RESULTS are to be reported to Medicare or private insurance companies.  The results are only shared with your chosen doctor.


A Healthy Lifestyle Can Make A Big Difference even if you have the gene mutation.

Insurance Companies Currently Participating:​

 Our CLIA Certified,
CAP Accredited Lab accepts

  • Original Medicare
  • All Advantage Plan PPOs
         except for BC/BS 
 
           No HMOs accepted

  • Medicaid in some states

​​

Personal & Family Cancer History includes: 
You and your blood relatives throughout multiple generations.
.
Have you or any one family member had:
.
.
  • breast cancer at age 45 or younger?
  • endometrial cancer?
  • uterine cancer under age 50?
  • prostate cancer?
  • colon cancer (colorectal)?
  • stomach cancer (gastric)?
  • pancreatic cancer?
  • ovarian or fallopian tube cancer at any age?
  • two or more cancers in one person?
  • more than one breast cancer diagnosis?
  • both breast and ovarian cancer?
  • triple-negative breast cancer?
  • Eastern European (Ashkenazi) Jewish ancestry? 
  • male breast cancer?
  • paraganglioma or Pheochromocytoma any age?
  • 20+ colorectal polyps in one person?
  • a family member that had a positive result for a gene mutation?

or do you have 2 or more family members on the same side of the family that 
have had:
.
  • breast cancer any age?
  • uterine cancer any age?
  • kidney cancer any age
  • multiple family on same side with ovarian or uterine cancer and another cancer?
  • multiple cancers in one person?
  • colorectal cancer under 50 with abnormal MSI/IHC?
  • multiple family members with colon, uterine, ovarian &/or stomach cancer?
  • pancreatic cancer under 60?
  • 20+ colorectal polyps in one person?
.
If you answered yes to any of these questions you should be tested.

Why Should You Get A Genetic Cancer Test?
.
With your test results, you and your Doctor will be more aware of any serious genetic risk that you may have and can implement regular, early preventative testing and treatment, as well as lifestyle assessment to keep cancer at bay.   ........................................................................................................................................

Because the test result not only tells you if you have the gene mutation that puts you at a higher risk for certain cancers, it tells you the level of risk and which cancer and where it is likely to manifest.  With increased surveillance, should cancer appear, it can be detected earlier than ever before
                              possible making treatment much less traumatic.                                                                                                      
You can help your family, children, and grandchildren with awareness of any serious genetic risk they too may have so they can be tested and implement healthy lifestyle changes.


The Testing Process is Simple
.
Medicare, select Private Insurance and Medicaid in many states, have come to realize the benefit of cancer prevention through genetic DNA testing and now cover the cost of cancer testing at little or

Zero Out-of-pocket for their policyholders.

We collect your Personal & Family Cancer History, and if you meet the medically necessary requirements, we then submit your information to a qualified Healthcare Professional for their review.  
They may need to ask you further questions to determine your qualifications for your Letter of Medical Necessity to obtain your Genetic Cancer Test. 

When your cancer history meets the qualifying parameters, we then perform a simple mouth swab from the lab provided test kit and mail it into our state-of-the-art laboratory for test completion.

It only takes about 4 to 6 weeks for your test to be processed and for your doctor to receive your results.  You can then schedule a follow-up consultation with your doctor to review your test results and implement any further testing, treatment and lifestyle assessment needed.

If you do have the gene mutation,
it does not mean you will get cancer. 


It means you are at a higher risk of getting certain cancer(s).  Having

this important information,  you and your doctor can then implement regular, early preventative testing, treatment, and healthy lifestyle changes to help keep cancer at bay and keep you healthy. 

You will also want to alert your family, children, and grandchildren to their possibility of also having the hereditary gene mutation, 
they can contact us and we will help them through the
testing process.  We help families all across the USA.

If you do not have the gene mutation
it does not mean you will not get cancer.


It simply means you have a lower risk of getting cancer. 
Healthy lifestyle choices including diet, exercise, not smoking, environment, etc are key to staying healthy.

Knowledge Is Power
 When Followed by Action!

Medicare Covers The Cost Of
This Preventative Test 100%

Schedule Your FREE TEST!

.
CALL NOW!

The New Standard in Cancer Prevention & Early Detection!​

We Want To Help You​​
.
By understanding your genetic risk for hereditary cancer, you and your doctor can make more informed decisions about your healthcare, manage your risks, and implement preventative care which can ward off cancer or detect cancer earlier than ever before, should it occur. 

How DNA Works
.
The majority of our DNA is the same from one person to the next, after all, we are all human. But, it's the remaining unique combination of variants that distinguishes us from one another.

Some of these differences are what increase or decrease our risk for certain diseases and how different medicines can affect us. These variants in our DNA are the basis of our unique genetic makeup.

Our Genes are not the only cause of cancer, other contributing factors are lifestyle, environment, diet, age, and exposure to toxic substances.

Now, with healthy lifestyle choices and the availability of Genetic Health Testing you can take the offensive against cancer with a simple Genetic Cancer Test.

Which Cancers Are Hereditary?
.
Some people are born with a gene mutation that they inherited from their mother or father. This damaged gene puts them at higher risk for cancer than most people. When cancer occurs because of an inherited gene mutation, it is referred to as hereditary cancer.

In recent years, scientists have discovered a number of mutations that can contribute to a person's risk of developing certain cancers, including breast, ovarian, colorectal (colon), and prostate cancer, as well as some other, less common cancer types. 
If Your Parent Had Cancer Will You Get Cancer?

If a parent tests positive for a mutatable gene then their children have a 1 in 2 chance (50%) of inheriting it.  So some children will have the mutatable gene and an increased risk of developing cancer and some children won't.

Will Taking A Genetic Cancer
Test Raise My Insurance Rates?
Some patients are concerned about their genetic tests being included in their medical history files.  Insurance companies use these files to assess pre-existing issues. NO GENETIC TEST RESULTS are to be reported to Medicare or private insurance companies.  The results are only shared with your chosen doctor.​


A Healthy Lifestyle Can Make A Big Difference even if you have the gene mutation.

Insurance Companies Currently Participating:*​

  • Medicare Part B
  • United Health Care Medicare PPO
  •      United Health Care Medicare Solutions PPO
  • ​​     Care Improvement Plus PPO​
  • Cigna Health Springs PPO
  • Humana Medicare PPO
  • Aetna Medicare​ PPO

*If your insurance company is not listed, please email me with your name, email & 
insurance name and when your insurance is added we will contact you.

Personal & Family Cancer History includes: 
You and your blood relatives throughout multiple generations
.
Have you or any one family member had:

​.
  • ovarian or fallopian tube cancer at any age?
  • breast cancer at age 45 or younger?
  • two or more cancers in one person?
  • more than one breast cancer diagnosis?
  • both breast and ovarian cancer?
  • triple-negative breast cancer?
  • Eastern European (Ashkenazi) Jewish ancestry? male breast cancer?
  • paraganglioma or Pheochromocytoma any age?
  • 10+ colorectal polyps in one person?
  • a family member had a positive result for a gene mutation?

or do you have 2 or more family members on the same side of the family that have had:

.
  • breast cancer?
  • uterine cancer under 50?
  • multiple family on same side with ovarian or uterine cancer and another cancer?
  • multiple cancers in one person?
  • colorectal cancer under 50 with abnormal MSI/IHC?
  • multiple family members with colon, uterine, ovarian &/or stomach cancer?
  • kidney cancer under 45 or multiple kidneycancers any age?
  • prostate cancer?
pancreatic cancer under 60?
.
If you answered yes to any of these questions you should be tested.


Sabina Totty​​

(615) 727-4871
[email protected]